Real Time Resilience Through Mindful Self-Compassion: Improving Performance and Job Satisfaction




Friday, May 4, 2018
9:00 AM – 4:00 PM
Maryann Mariani, Ph.D. and Lea Christo, LICSW

The stress and demands of providing direct care in a human service environment places daunting demands on human service professionals. It is well known that these stressors can have an impact on a person’s job satisfaction and overall effectiveness. This training, Real Time Resilience Through Mindful Self-Compassion, is designed to have a positive impact on your performance, job satisfaction and to reduce the effects of burnout.

Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) is an evidence-based practice that is highly effective in mitigating the increased risk for occupational burn-out and vicarious trauma clinicians often experience (Sprang, Clark, & Whitt-Woosley, 2007). By learning how to take care of yourself with resilience skills in real time, you are better able to work compassionately with clients and colleagues. MSC helps people in caregiving roles maintain their personal mental health and sustain their prolonged engagement with clients. People who achieve high scores on the Self Compassion Scale also report high ratings of job satisfaction (Abaci & Arda, 2013). It is expected that these positive outcomes will also reduce staff turnover and improve interdisciplinary collaboration, ultimately helping vulnerable clients and families meet their service plan goals.

Mindful Self-Compassion involves three core components: self-kindness, common humanity and mindfulness (Neff, 2011). Self-kindness is being kind to ourselves, that is, gentle and understanding rather than critical and judgmental. Common humanity involves the view of being connected to others and not isolated. Lastly mindfulness, involves being mindful with our experience in balance and awareness. MSC practice is linked to improved well-being, lessening suffering, and increasing connections with others. It is also useful in prevention and intervention of symptoms of depression, anxiety, and negative emotions. Practicing self-compassion is helpful in dealing with stress and promoting wellness.

Participants will learn about the recent research in self-compassion, how to assess self-compassion, and how to develop formal and informal practices in the workplace and at home. The learning will emphasize the development of specific practices that can be used during the workday with team members, clients and families.

Following this training the participants will be able to:

  • Describe the research on self-compassion
  • Describe Mindfulness, Loving Kindness and Compassion
  • Demonstrate how to assess self-compassion
  • Demonstrate how to develop mindfulness practices in the workplace and at home
  • Describe the Stress Response and the Importance of Self Care for Job Satisfaction
  • Describe the physiology of self-compassion and self-criticism
  • Describe The hidden value in suffering
  • List and demonstrate Strategies for Meeting Difficult Emotions

Mary Ann Mariani, Ph.D., is the former Director of the School Counseling Program and the Institute for School Counseling and School Psychology at Assumption College. Dr. Mariani also developed and taught in the Resiliency Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study and School Counseling Program at Assumption College. Dr. Mariani is a former Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies at Assumption College.

Dr. Mariani has completed intensive training as a teacher of Mindful Self-Compassion through the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine.

In addition to her work at Assumption College, Dr. Mariani has held special education teaching, administrative, and psychologist positions in numerous school districts. She held an adjunct faculty position at Boston College and has a private practice.

Lea Christo, MSW, LICSW is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Human Services and Rehabilitation Studies at Assumption College where she is the Director of the Health Advocacy Program and teaches in the Resiliency Certificate Program, School Counseling and Health Advocacy Graduate Programs.

Ms. Christo has completed intensive training as a teacher of Mindful Self-Compassion through the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine.

In addition to her work at Assumption College, Ms. Christo has worked at The Massachusetts Department of Social Services, McLean Hospital, The University of Massachusetts Medical Center, Friendly House and The Holy Trinity Eastern Orthodox Nursing and Rehabilitation Center.

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